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  • Who Pays Colorado Taxes?

    Who Pays Colorado Taxes?0

    • September 16, 2015

    Linda Gorman writes about the 38 percent increase in Colorado state spending.

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  • 2015 Thumbnail Guide to Colorado’s Spending Problem0

    • July 29, 2015

    IB-D-2015 (July 2015) Author: Linda Gorman PDF of full Issue Backgrounder Introduction: Colorado state government has a spending problem. Between FY 1999-00 and FY 2013-14, its inflation-adjusted expenditures rose by 38 percent.1 Its inflation-adjusted revenues rose by just 34 percent. Although Colorado’s working age population grew over the period, its private sector employment stagnated.

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  • Amendment 66: More Spending Doesn’t Buy Higher Student Achievement0

    • October 25, 2013

    Parents spend their money to benefit their children. School bureaucrats spend other people’s money to benefit the schools and those who run them. Amendment 66 raises taxes to take money from working Coloradans. It gives the broken public school bureaucracy more to spend and leaves parents with less. Taking money from parents harms children.

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  • Amendment 66: Spend More, Get Less (Part 2)0

    • October 25, 2013

    More spending does not create better schools. Many well-funded districts have lower graduation rates. Colorado Springs spent $1,500 less than Denver. It graduated 76 percent of its students, while Denver only graduated 46 percent. If passing Amendment 66 lets Denver spend $4,000 more, it might end up matching Indianapolis’s 30 percent graduation rate.

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  • Amendment 66: Spend More, Get Less0

    • October 10, 2013

    IB-G-2013 (October 2013) Author: Linda Gorman PDF of full Issue Backgrounder Introduction: Amendment 66 will take the money you spend to benefit your children and give it to public education bureaucrats. Education bureaucrats do not necessarily use higher funding to benefit children. They will spend it on things that they like – generous pensions, higher

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  • The Colorado Government Pension System Introduction and Basic Organization0

    • April 22, 2013

    Colorado’s Public Employee Retirement Association (PERA) is the State’s largest pension plan, with more than 483,000 members as of 2011. Government contributions exceeded $1 billion in FY2011.

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